International Museum Day 2017

May 18 11:20 2017 Print This Article

You are cordially invited to join us  at the Museum of Belize in our celebration of International Museum Day.

BELIZE CITY, Belize— The Museum of Belize presents “An Open Panel Discussion” on the history of the Death Penalty in Belize, with special focus on the question, ‘Should Belize resume the death penalty?’  In light of the continuous surge in crime, this pivotal topic will be dissected by an extraordinary panel consisting of well-versed legal, social and historical professionals:

Senior Counsel Simeon Sampson, Crown Counsel Shanidi Chell, Crown Counsel Javier Chan, Mrs. Dianne Finnegan, Bernard Adolphus.

The Museum of Belize and the Worldwide community of museums will celebrate International Museum Day on and around May 18th, 2017.  The International Council of Museums (ICOM) established International Museum Day in 1977 to increase public awareness of the role of museums in the development of society.

Excerpt from the official Press Release:

Events:

  • Thursday, May 18th, 2017: At 9:30am – 12:00pm (noon) – An open panel discussion consisting of representatives from the legal, social and historical spectrum on the topic of the crime status in Belize, and the implications of resuming the death penalty.
  • Friday, May 19th, 2017: At 9:30am – 3:30 pm – An open day with educational booths, from our stakeholders, providing outreach and information. Open to the general public.

The Museum of Belize and the Worldwide community of museums will celebrate International Museum Day on and around May 18th, 2017. The International Council of Museums (ICOM) established International Museum Day in 1977 to increase public awareness of the role of museums in the development of society.

Within the Museum of Belize’s role toward the development of society is the task of disseminating information on the building we occupy. Once Her Majesty’s Prison, from 1857 to 1998, is our connection to the history of executions in Belize. The controversial topic of the death penalty was the most fitting discourse in alignment with this year’s International Museum Day theme ‘Museums and Contested Histories: Saying the Unspeakable in Museums’.

Historically, it is chronicled that the last person to be executed in Belize was at Her Majesty’s Prison in 1985. Since that time, no one has been executed in this country, notwithstanding, that the death penalty still stands in Belize’s constitution. In face of an increasing crime rate, re-instating the death penalty is, for some, food for thought.

In an effort of conducting research and lectures in nurturing outreach and education by enabling historical and cultural appreciation, our dynamic panel will attempt to dissect the prolific topic of the death penalty from a historical and contemporary points of view. Whilst exploring the various perspectives on the notion of re-implementing corporal punishment in Belize, we pose this question: Would resuming the death penalty render any change to the surge of capital crimes in our country?